Tuesday, April 20, 2010

May Lecture at the Museum

The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History will continue its “Robert L. Long Distinguished Lecture Series” with a talk on the on May 4, 2010, at the Museum. The lecture will be the fourth in a series of lectures on the technical, political and personal aspects of energy generation, distribution, and consumption. The lecture is entitled “How We’re Vulnerable: the Energy, Education, and Cyber Threats to US National Security.”

 Edward Bruce Held is the Director of the Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence at the Department of Energy in Washington, DC.  Prior to his selection as Director, he was Chief of Counterintelligence at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM; reporting directly to the Sandia National Laboratories Chief Operating Officer, Dr. Al Romig.  As the Chief of Counterintelligence, Held made significant contributions to the protection and security of one of this nation’s nuclear security laboratories.  His expertise in the areas of intelligence and counterintelligence established the highest standards in the protection of the work conducted at this laboratory.


“America is preeminent in both conventional and strategic forces and will likely remain so for at least a decade,” says Held. “Potential peer adversaries have learned from the Soviet Union that it is unwise to engage the dynamic US economy in a military arms race. In this context, energy, education, and cyber may well constitute the most important asymmetric strategic threats to US national security.”
Prior to his position at Sandia National Laboratories, Held served as a clandestine operations officer in the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) where he received the Intelligence Commendation Medal for “tenacity and extraordinary accomplishments during a period of hostilities.”  During his career with the CIA, Held served as the Chief of Station in Asia, Latin America, and Africa.  Held also served as Special Assistant to Anthony Lake, National Security Adviser to President Clinton, and as Special Assistant to George Tenet, Director of Central Intelligence.

The lecture series is named for Robert Long, who passed away in 2009. Friends and colleagues established the lecture series to honor his long career in education and the nuclear industry and his commitment to the National Museum of Nuclear Science & History.

The lectures cost $10 to attend ($5 with Museum membership) and the doors open at 6:30 p.m. for a 7:15 lecture.

1 comment:

雯彬 said...

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